U.N. Promotes China As Key To Humanitarian Effort….Yet China Has An Abysmal Death Penalty Record

Posted: November 2, 2014 in Society and Culture

Make no mistake the U.N. likes State power and bureaucracy!


China ‘key’ to shaping future of global humanitarian action – top UN relief official

Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs Valerie Amos. UN Photo/Rick Bajornas

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1 November 2014 – United Nations Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs, Valerie Amos, concluding a two-day mission to China today said the world can learn a great deal from the Asian country’s experience in building disaster management and response capacity.

A wrap-up press release from the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), which Ms. Amos heads, noted that every year China suffers from serious floods, droughts, typhoons and earthquakes, so there has been substantial investment in developing its disaster management capabilities including forecast technology and emergency planning.

China has a wealth of knowledge and expertise in managing natural disasters, and is one of a small group of countries that is able to deploy a ‘heavy’ international search and rescue team with the operational capability to handle difficult and complex technical search and rescue operations.

“I thank China for their contributions to humanitarian crises in the region and around the world and look forward to our continued collaboration,” said Ms. Amos, who is also UN Emergency Relief Coordinator.

“We have a very close relationship with China and I have had very useful discussions with Government, the diplomatic community, humanitarian and private sector partners on how together, we can address the humanitarian challenges the international community continues to face,” said added.

During her visit, Valerie Amos met Vice-Premier Wang Yang, Minister of Commerce, Gao Hucheng, Vice-Minister of Civil Affairs, Jiang Li, China Earthquake Administration Vice-Administrator, Xiu Jigang, and other senior officials, to discuss ways of strengthening the partnership between the UN and China on disaster management.

Discussing growing humanitarian needs across the world and the humanitarian challenges facing the international community people with students, representatives of civil society, philanthropic organizations and the private sector at an event at the Communications University of China, Ms. Amos said, that as global demands increase, humanitarian organizations are becoming more diverse and that new actors and sectors are getting involved in preparedness and recovery.

“Here in China, a robust philanthropic movement is emerging, and foundations are increasingly influential players in both domestic and international disaster response work. We need to work together to make sure that everyone’s voices are heard,” she said, noting that this is why Secretary-general Ban Ki-moon is convening the first ever World Humanitarian Summit in Istanbul, in 2016, to “to set an agenda for future humanitarian action.”

SOURCE: http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=49229

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Death Penalty Worldwide

China

Last updated on April 10, 2014

General

Official Country Name

People’s Republic of China (China). [1]

Geographical Region

Asia (Eastern Asia). [2]

Death Penalty Law Status

Retentionist. [3]

According to media reports, executions were carried out in 2014. [4]

Methods of Execution

Lethal Injection. [5]

Shooting. [6]

Comments.
Lethal injection and shooting are the only methods authorized by China’s Criminal Procedure Law of 1996. [7] Shooting executions were discontinued in 2010 per a People’s Supreme Court ruling of February 2009 which held that lethal injection is a more humane form of execution than shooting. [8] Lethal injection (using a mixture of barbiturates, muscle relaxant, and potassium chloride [9] ) was legalized in 1996 and has been used since the late 1990s. [10] In June 2009, the Chinese government announced that it was a long-term objective to replace the firing squad with lethal injection. [11] It is carried out in prisons or in mobile “death vans,” where prisoners are reportedly strapped to an electric-powered stretcher and injected with lethal drugs. [12] The use of these vans has been decreasing since the late 2000s due to the expense of maintaining the vans. [13]

At least one source reports that persons convicted of economic or political crimes may be more likely to be executed by lethal injection than persons convicted of general crimes, who may be more likely to be shot; however, that same source indicates that lethal injection in a prison facility is a less expensive form of execution and was initially implemented in high crime-rate areas where it would be more likely that offenders were being executed for general crimes. [14] The cost of a single dose of lethal injection is cheaper—at 300 yuan—than the 700 yuan price tag of a firing squad. [15] Scholars point to this factor, profit, ease of secrecy, and reduction of family complaints (due to massive disfiguration caused by shots to the back of the condemned’s head) as factors motivating the switchover to lethal injection, [16] which has progressed at a slow pace. [17]

References

[1] BBC, Country Profiles: China Profile, http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-pacific-13017879, May 21, 2013.
[2] U.N., Composition of macro geographical (continental) regions, geographical sub-regions, and selected economic and other groupings, http://unstats.un.org/unsd/methods/m49/m49regin.htm, Oct. 31, 2013.
[3] Amnesty Intl., Death Sentences and Executions 2012, p. 18-19, ACT 50/001/2013, Apr. 10, 2013.
[4] Katie Hunt, China executes man who kept 6 women in dungeon as sex slaves, CNN, http://www.cnn.com/2014/01/22/world/asia/china-sex-slaves-execution/, Jan. 22, 2014.
[5] Criminal Procedure Law of the People’s Republic of China, art. 212, Jul. 1, 1979, as amended through to Mar. 14, 2012.
[6] Criminal Procedure Law of the People’s Republic of China, art. 212, Jul. 1, 1979, as amended through to Mar. 14, 2012.
[7] Criminal Procedure Law of the People’s Republic of China, art. 212, Jul. 1, 1979, as amended through to Mar. 14, 2012.
[8] Cristian Segura, China injects ‘humanity’ into death sentence, Asia Times, http://www.atimes.com/atimes/China/KL16Ad01.html, Dec. 16, 2009. Sugita Katyal, China to swap bullets for lethal injections, Reuters, http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE55F0XT20090616, Jun. 16, 2009.
[9] Cristian Segura, China injects ‘humanity’ into death sentence, Asia Times, http://www.atimes.com/atimes/China/KL16Ad01.html, Dec. 16, 2009.
[10] Cristian Segura, China injects ‘humanity’ into death sentence, Asia Times, http://www.atimes.com/atimes/China/KL16Ad01.html, Dec. 16, 2009. Sugita Katyal, China to swap bullets for lethal injections, Reuters, http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE55F0XT20090616, Jun. 16, 2009. Criminal Procedure Law of the People’s Republic of China, art. 212, Jul. 1, 1979, as amended through to Mar. 14, 2012. Clive Stafford Smith, China must show mercy, The Guardian, http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/libertycentral/2009/oct/24/china-death-penalty, Oct. 24, 2009.
[11] Amnesty Intl., Death Sentences and Executions 2009, p. 13, ACT 50/001/2010, Mar. 30, 2010.
[12] Andrew Malone, China’s hi-tech ‘death van’ where criminals are executed and then their organs are sold on black market, Mail Online, http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1165416/Chinas-hi-tech-death-van-criminals-executed-organs-sold-black-market.html, Mar. 27, 2009. Cristian Segura, China injects ‘humanity’ into death sentence, Asia Times, http://www.atimes.com/atimes/China/KL16Ad01.html, Dec. 16, 2009.
[13] Cristian Segura, China injects ‘humanity’ into death sentence, Asia Times, http://www.atimes.com/atimes/China/KL16Ad01.html, Dec. 16, 2009.
[14] Cristian Segura, China injects ‘humanity’ into death sentence, Asia Times, http://www.atimes.com/atimes/China/KL16Ad01.html, Dec. 16, 2009.
[15] Cristian Segura, China injects ‘humanity’ into death sentence, Asia Times, http://www.atimes.com/atimes/China/KL16Ad01.html, Dec. 16, 2009.
[16] Johnson & Zimring, The Next Frontier: National Development, Political Change, and the Death Penalty in Asia, p. 275, Oxford University Press, 2009.
[17] Sugita Katyal, China to swap bullets for lethal injections, Reuters, http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE55F0XT20090616, Jun. 16, 2009. CNN, Chinese province favors lethal injection over gunshot, http://www.cnn.com/2009/WORLD/asiapcf/12/11/china.lethal.injection/index.html, Dec. 11, 2009.

Country Details

Language(s)

Mandarin Chinese. [1]

Population

1,350,000,000. [2]

Number of Individuals Currently Under Sentence of Death

The number is a state secret. [3] It is difficult to estimate because many prisoners do not linger on death row – they are either executed immediately, [4] or given a suspended two-year sentence after which they are either executed or have their sentence commuted. [5] According to Amnesty International, China imposed 7003 death sentences in 2008, although this may be a significant underestimate. [6] A 2009 estimate had China passing out about 140 sentences per week. [7] With an annual execution rate in the thousands, there must be thousands of death sentences handed down every year. [8]

Annual Number of Reported Executions

Executions in 2014 to date (last updated on November 22, 2014)

We have found media reports of 17 executions. [9] This is a tiny fraction of the actual number of executions, which is a state secret. Human rights organizations estimate that China carries out thousands of executions a year, more than the rest of the world together. [10]

Executions in 2013

Information about the number of executions is a state secret. [11] Human rights organizations estimate that China carries out thousands of executions a year, more executions than carried out in the rest of the world. [12] Based on estimates published in recent years, we estimate that there were at least 3,000 executions. [13]

Per capita execution rate in 2013

1 execution per 446,204 persons

Executions in 2012

3,000.

Information about the number of executions is a state secret. [14] Human rights organizations estimate that China carries out thousands of executions a year, more executions than carried out in the rest of the world. [15] We rely on the number provided by the Dui Hua Foundation, which estimated that 3,000 executions were carried out. [16]

Per capita execution rate in 2012

1 execution per 450,000 persons

Executions in 2011

4,000.

Information about the number of executions is a state secret. [17] Human rights organizations estimate that China carries out thousands of executions a year, more executions than carried out in the rest of the world. [18] The United Kingdom Foreign and Commonwealth Office notes that estimates range from hundreds to over 5,000. [19] Amnesty International estimates that there were thousands of executions in China in 2011. [20] We rely on the number provided by the Dui Hua Foundation, which estimates that China executed approximately 4,000 people in 2011. [21]

Per capita execution rate in 2011

1 execution per 337,500 persons

Executions in 2010

5,000.

Information about the number of executions is a state secret. [22] Human rights organizations estimate that China carries out thousands of executions a year, more executions than carried out in the rest of the world. [23] The United Kingdom Foreign and Commonwealth office estimated that there could have been up to 10,000 executions. [24] We rely on the number provided by the Dui Hua Foundation, which estimated that 5,000 people were executed in 2010. [25]

Executions in 2009

5,000.

Information about the number of executions is a state secret. [26] Human rights organizations estimate that China carries out thousands of executions a year, more executions than carried out in the rest of the world. [27] 5,000 is the Dui Hua Foundation’s estimate, which may have come from leaks from official sources. [28]

Executions in 2008

5,000.

1,718 is the official figure, quoted by Amnesty International. [29] We rely on the figure provided by the Dui Hua Foundation, which reported that an estimated 5,000 executions were carried out in 2008. [30]

Executions in 2007

6,500.

470 is the official figure, likely drastically under-reported due to Olympics-related scrutiny. [31] The Dui Hua Foundation estimates that as many as 6,500 people were executed in 2007, [32] which may have come from leaks from official sources. [33]

Year of Last Known Execution

2014. [34]

SOURCE: http://www.deathpenaltyworldwide.org/country-search-post.cfm?country=China

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